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Cuxhaven starts using LOT trestles

Petunia Seaways and a row pre-tresled trailers.

Petunia Seaways operating on Cuxhaven – Immingham is hoping to experience faster turnarounds because of one significant change – new trestles.

When uncoupled trailers are loaded onto our vessels, they need trestles to support the front of the trailer to minimise the risk of collapse. Earlier this year, Cuxhaven received the more efficient and safer LOT trestles to replace the conventional ones.


A DFDS trailer with a trestle connected. The truck is free to move and place the trailer without needing to disconnect the trestle.

Less lashing, no need to manually position the trestles and the possibility to pre-trestle trailers are expected to reduce the time required to load or unload the vessel. In addition, it also saves space on board as it requires less lashing equipment and conventional trestles on decks. Furthermore, they improve safety as they are stronger and locked to the trailer.


Reefers and trailers supported by the new trestles

Successful and smooth implementation
Karsten Ihlemann, Terminal Manager in Cuxhaven, says: “We managed to successfully implement the LOT system. Thank you to the Equipment Centre, our colleagues from the terminal in Immingham and our partner Rhenus Cuxport, as well as the crew of Petunia Seaways for a job well done.”

Ortolf Barth, Route Director, says: “We are happy with this change. However, we are also looking forward to the change to the SAT system. This enables the trestle to fully connect with the vessels, if the conditions here in Cuxhaven allow it.”

Nick Forsyth, Head of Equipment, Fleet Management, says: “Even with the restriction of coronavirus, this changeover ran smoothly. The Equipment Centre team, whilst working remotely, had great collaboration with the Cuxhaven Route Office, both terminals in Immingham and Cuxhaven, the Petunia Seaways crew and our third party workshops in the UK and Sweden. Additionally, thanks should be given for the support from the Vlaardingen team who welcomed the extra challenge of their revised trestle allotments to assist neighbouring routes and make this change possible.”

Petunia Seaways being refurbished

We have just received these nice pictures of Petunia Seaways taken just before she left the dock at the Remontowa shipyard in Gdansk, Poland.

Christian Bagger, Superintendent in Technical Organisation, says: “Petunia has just undergone her third special survey. The bottom of the ship has been sandblasted, she has been coated with silicone paint and new bridge equipment has been installed.”

Thanks for the great pictures!

 

 

Jutlandia Seaways to assist on the Ghent – Gothenburg route

Luckily no-one was injured when Primula Seaways was hit by the container ship MSC Madrid on Saturday, and fortunately there was no pollution in spite of the substantial damage to the hull.

“In an unfortunate situation like this, our network strength and fleet flexibility really show its high value. It helps us find solutions that can mitigate the effect on our services and thus on our customers,” says Peder Gellert, EVP and Head of the Shipping Division.  He is pleased with the opportunities which a solution found in excellent cooperation between business units North Sea South, North Sea North and our fleet management is providing.

The solution is based on a chartered ship and swapping of vessels

On the Cuxhaven-Immingham route, the chartered vessel Neptune Dynamis will replace Jutlandia Seaways so she can be moved to Immingham-Gothenburg.

On Immingham-Gothenburg,  Jutlandia Seaways will take up service for Petunia Seaways which is now helping out on Gothenburg-Ghent. Petunia Seaways has until now been replaced by Ark Germania as the thrid vessel on the route.

On Gothenburg-Ghent, they will get Ark Germania back, and Petunia Seaways will continue as replacement for Primula Seaways. This means we can again offer our customers a four ship service on Gothenburg-Ghent.

The changes will be in effect from Tuesday next week.

We believe Peder Gellert is particularly happy with this solution as Primula Seaways may be out of service for several weeks. However, according to Thomas Mørk, VP of Technical Organisation, we will need to wait until at least the end of the week before we can be more specific about this.

Augmented reality: Watch video about how it works

Last week we wrote about a test of a new tool called Augmented Reality  – a digitally improved reality with layers of information added to a 3D image of the engine. The test was carried out by MAN on an auxiliary engine on Petunia Seaways, and now MAN sent a video showing how the tool works.  While Second Engineer Stefan Börgesson  loosens a bolt on the auxiliary engine of Petunia Seaways you can see how he is getting accurate instructions from the 3D image of the engine and the tool through his digital glasses.

“It is an awesome technology. When developed to a higher level, it will merge the physical and the digital tools and make it much easier to give engineers proper instructions, says Jacob Petersen, Project Manager, Technical Organisation.

Augmented Reality: DFDS in the first row in MAN test of new digital technology

Brave new world: Second Engineer Stefan Börgesson loosens a bolt on the auxiliary engine of Petunia Seaways while he is getting accurate instructions from the 3D image of the engine and the tool through his digital glasses. This is Augmented Reality that merges physical and digital tools. DFDS was asked to test it for the developer MAN.

Try to imagine that you are repairing an engine. And while doing it, you are wearing digital glasses, showing you an accurate 3D image of the engine with the bolt you need to loosen highlighted so you can easily find it. On the image you can also see the bolt moving while you are loosening it physically on the engine. In addition to this, the 3D image allows you to see what happens in the interior of the engine when you loosen the bolt.

This is Augmented Reality – a digitally improved reality with layers of information added to a 3D image of the engine. This makes up a manual as you have never seen it before, and a far more efficient one than the usual paper version. “However, it is merely a shadow of what you can use this technology for in the future,” Augmented Reality will have many additional uses in the future,” predicts Jacob Petersen, Project Manager, Technical Organisation.

“Engine manufacturer MAN is developing the tool and they have asked us to participate in a development test on an auxiliary engine on Petunia Seaways. Even though the tool is still being developed, it was an eye-opening experience – not least for Second Engineer Stefan Börgesson who was carrying out the test. “ he says.

“It was extremely accurate. It is an awesome technology. When developed to a higher level, it will merge the physical and the digital tools and make it much easier to give engineers proper instructions.

“Interaction between head office, ships and manufacturers is key. This is the first time I have experienced such close contact with the developers. It was great to interact with the people from MAN who are developing the equipment. We guided each other in the right direction,” says Jacob.

We will be back with more when MAN has completed a video about the test.